The Great American Eclipse: What You Missed & Will You See It Again

by | Aug 23, 2017 | Stories

Total SolSolar Eclipse Picture - Eclipse Blog

The two minutes of eclipse totality came and went, but those who saw the sun and moon align so perfectly for a minute were witnesses to the earth going dark in the middle of the day – a pretty spectacular event. Forbes contributing author, Ethan Siegel, writes, “it’s been said that on a scale of 1 to 10, a partial eclipse is a 5, while an annular eclipse is a 9, making a total eclipse a 10. Racing across the country faster than the speed of sound, the total solar eclipse arrived mid-morning on the coast of Oregon and stretched across the country to South Carolina before the moon’s shadow went out to sea. What is being called, the Great American Eclipse, hasn’t crossed the country since 1918, when World War I raged and Woodrow Wilson was president. Whether you were an eclipse-watcher from work, a viewing party, or your own front yard, this cosmic spectacle left many with an awakened childlike wonder, as for some, this may have been a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

However if you missed it, don’t lose hope just yet, the next total eclipse takes place just south of North America. On July 2, 2019, a total Solar Eclipse is predicted to cross over Chile and Argentina, after its made its way over the Pacific Ocean. Unlike the eclipse experienced on Monday, South America’s path of totality is expected to block out up to 4 minutes and 33 seconds of the sun, double what most American’s witnessed.

Can’t make it south? People that missed it will have the chance to see another in less than a decade in the United States; this time the path extends from Texas to Maine. On April 8, 2024 the moon will once again block out the sun providing an opportunity for people to experience one of nature’s most stunning sights. Prior to the next solar eclipse, an annular eclipse is predicted to occur just a few months prior on October 14,2023. Nicknamed the “ring of fire”, this eclipse will be visible from California to Texas and will make the sun appear as a thin ring of sunshine around the moon. The moon lies too far away to completely cover the sun, creating this alluring effect, unlike during a total eclipse when the moon comes very close to the earth.

If you saw Monday’s eclipse and are lucky enough to get to see the eclipse on August 12,2045, it is predicted to be even more impressive. The shadow of the moon will cross the country again from Northern California to Texas but is expected to completely block the sun for over 6 minutes. This will be considered the longest total solar eclipse experienced anywhere in the world….until 2114.

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